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INDICATION & USAGE

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO, including protamine sulfate a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

    

INDICATION & USAGE

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO, including protamine sulfate  a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals  is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

    

 

 

Backpackers’ delight: How to stay safe on that hiking trip through Asia (Tip: there are some easy things you can do!)

Jul 17, 2018 | Outdoors, Travel

You’re finally heading off on the backpacking trek you’ve been planning for months (or years) and gearing up to hit the trails of Asia. As you prepare for your trip, your thoughts are likely occupied with visions of the food, wildlife and scenery you’ll encounter, and coordinating where (and if) you’ll have Wi-Fi along the way. While there is plenty to consider when planning a trip abroad, your health should be at the top of the list.

Asia’s vibrant cities and varied landscape make it a true traveler’s paradise, but it is also home to some diseases that most Americans aren’t familiar with. It’s important that travelers have a basic understanding of potential diseases endemic to the areas where they are traveling, and learn how to prevent them. A survey of 776 U.S. adults who visited Asia for at least 10 days found that only 18 percent saw a travel medicine specialist – experts in preparing people for health-related travel issues – prior to departure.i

As is true in many parts of the United States, tropical diseases in Asia can be transmitted by mosquitoes. Mosquitoes in Asia may carry pathogens such as Zika, dengue, or Japanese encephalitis (JE) viruses. In the case of JE virus, a rare but serious mosquito-borne virus affecting an estimated 68,000 people each yearii, those traveling to rural areas – here’s looking at you, backpackers – are considered at increased risk of exposure.iii

Taking a few simple precautions can help to keep you safe and healthy while trekking across some of the world’s most beautiful terrain.

 

  • Reduce exposure to mosquitoes during peak hoursiv
    • Mosquitoes are most active during the cooler hours from dusk to dawn. Limit the amount of time spent outside or with exposed skin during these hours.
  • Use insect repellentiv
    • Use EPA-registered insect repellent, such as those containing DEET, IR3535, picaridin or oil of lemon eucalyptus.
  • Wear protective clothingiv
    • Wear clothing that covers as much of your skin as possible, such as long sleeves, pants and high socks when outdoors.
  • Carry a mosquito netiv
    • If you are backpacking, you’ll likely spend the night outdoors. And even if you splurge on a hotel, the same survey also found that fewer than half of hotels in Asia offered sleeping nets. Best to pack your own. Bonus: nets are light and won’t weigh you down!
  • Vaccinate if you are at increased risk of exposurev
    • Some of the more serious illnesses, such as Japanese encephalitis, can be prevented by vaccine.
    • Visit the Center for Disease Control’s site, or make an appointment with a qualified travel health physician well in advance of travel, to see if you’re considered at high risk. More info about JE can be found here.

Taking a few extra steps to stay healthy, along with a quick visit to a travel health specialist, will leave you resting easy on your expedition. Here’s to happy trails.

Find a travel health specialist near you by visiting CDC’s website at wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/find-clinic.

This article is sponsored by Valneva USA, Inc. To learn more about Japanese Encephalitis and how to protect yourself, visit www.preventje.com.

  1. Data on file.
  2. World Health Organization. Japanese encephalitis Fact sheet no.386. December 2015. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs386/en. March 27, 2018.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Japanese Encephalitis Frequently Asked Questions. Updated August 5, 2015. http://www.cdc.gov/japaneseencephalitis/qa/index.html%3Chttp://www.cdc.gov/japaneseencephalitis/qa/index.html%3E. Accessed July 24, 2018.
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Yellow Book 2018, Chapter 2. Updated May 2017. wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2018/the-pre-travel-consultation/protection-against-mosquitoes-ticks-other-arthropods. Accessed July 24, 2018.
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Travel Smart: Get Vaccinated. Updated May 21, 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/features/vaccines-travel/index.html. Accessed July 24, 2018.

Indication & Usage

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO,  including protamine sulfate a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

 

 

 

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