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INDICATION & USAGE

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO, including protamine sulfate a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

    

INDICATION & USAGE

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO, including protamine sulfate  a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals  is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

    

 

 

Before you board: protecting your health on international business trips

Jul 10, 2018 | Business, Travel

Traveling for work has its perks – new places, experiences, and inspiration – but it’s no secret that frequent or extended business travel can take a toll on your health. In addition to jetlag, stress, and less-than-ideal food options in airports and hotels, there’s also an increased risk of exposure to communicable illnesses – like the flu – that can quickly turn a “bleisure” (read: business + leisure) trip down an unpleasant path.

Home to the world’s second- and third-largest economies, Asia is becoming a common destination for business travel. One disease to be aware of when visiting Asia is Japanese encephalitis (JE).JE is a rare but serious illness caused by a virus that is found across parts of Asia and transmitted through a mosquito bite.iIt is the leading cause of vaccine-preventable encephalitis in Asia.ii As there is no specific treatment for JE, the best protection against JE is prevention – avoiding mosquito bites and vaccinating before travel if your doctor suggests it.i

There are some simple steps to take before your next business trip that will help to keep you healthy and at peak performance for the big trip.

  • Depending on your destination, the weather can differ greatly by time of year and region, so bring clothing that suits the temperature (and be prepared for unexpected changes in climate if the area experiences changeable weather patterns).
  • Hydrate! Drinking enough water before, during, and after your flight can help ease some of the common symptoms of jetlag.iii
  • Pack the essentials – while in many countries you’ll have easy access to common healthcare products, it’s best to be prepared and stock the essential products to treat a headache, upset stomach, or motion sickness. (Sunscreen and a basic first-aid kit are also wise to have on-hand.)iv
  • Play it safe and ask the experts. A visit to a travel health specialist can provide destination-specific advice on foodborne pathogens, drinking water, medications, and vaccines. (For example, based on your location, duration of travel, and itinerary, it might be suggested that you get a vaccine for Japanese encephalitis.) Make sure to visit a travel health specialist well in advance of your trip as some vaccines should be administered at least thirty days before travel.v

Most importantly, a little homework before departure will serve you well. A recent survey of 776 adults who had traveled to Asia in the last 24 months revealed that fewer than half had sought the care of a qualified health professional prior to departure.vi While a trip to a family physician is never a bad idea, if you travel frequently or have extended work trips, consider visiting a travel health specialist. Travel health practitioners can provide expert health advice that is specific to where you are visiting, from tips on eating and drinking to information on diseases endemic to different parts of the world and how to prevent them.v

Find a travel health specialist near you by visiting the Center of Disease Control (CDC) website at wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/find-clinic. The CDC website is also a good resource for travel information, advisories, and vaccination guidelines.

This article is sponsored by Valneva USA, Inc. To learn more about Japanese encephalitis and how to protect yourself, visit www.preventje.com.

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Japanese encephalitis. Updated August 2015 https://www.cdc.gov/japaneseencephalitis/.   Accessed July 24, 2018.
  2. World Health Organization. Fact sheets. Japanese encephalitis. Published December 2015. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs386/en. Accessed July 24, 2018.
  3. Harvard Health Publishing. “Travel Tips: Ways to Minimize Jet Lag – Harvard Health.” Harvard Health Blog, Harvard Medical School, www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/travel-tips-ways-to-minimize-jet-lag.
  4. Team, Family Health. “What First-Aid Items You Need to Pack When You Travel.” Health Essentials from Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland Clinic, March 14, 2018, health.clevelandclinic.org/what-first-aid-items-you-need-to-pack-when-you-travel/.
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. See a Doctor Before You Travel. Updated December 22, 2008. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/see-doctor. Accessed July 24, 2018.
  6. Data on file.

Indication & Usage

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO,  including protamine sulfate a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

 

 

 

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