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INDICATION & USAGE

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO, including protamine sulfate a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

    

INDICATION & USAGE

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO, including protamine sulfate  a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals  is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

    

 

 

Do your employees need a travel health specialist? How to prepare your team for expat assignments

Jul 13, 2018 | Business, Travel

Home to the world’s second- and third-largest economies, Asia is becoming a common place for new office locations and extended overseas business assignments. Despite this growing popularity in today’s increasingly globalized economy, employers may overlook some of the necessary steps to prepare their team for safe overseas travel. In fact, a survey of U.S. adults who had visited Asia for 30 or more days revealed that the majority did not visit a travel health professional to discuss health concerns prior to departure.

An overseas assignment is an exciting opportunity for many employees, but it is never entirely without risk. While preparing your team for international travel, remember that there are steps you can take to increase their chances of success while on assignment – starting with their health!

Prevention as part of preparation

Prevention is the first important step for a safe and healthy trip. Some employees may face a higher risk of exposure to certain diseases based on where they are staying, the time of year of travel, and the duration of stay. Access to medical care may also vary by region. It’s recommended that travelers who will be on an extended assignment and their families visit a travel health practitioner at least a month before departure to have a general check-up and receive any necessary prescriptions.  If the primary traveler’s family will accompany them on the overseas assignment, they should also visit a travel health specialist for the same check-up.

A travel health physician or nurse can also brief patients on diseases endemic to their destinations as well as the best ways to protect against exposure. For the many traveling to Asia, this should include critical information regarding Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus – the most common cause of vaccine-preventable encephalitis on that continent – which is carried and transmitted by mosquitoes.

Dr. Scott Morcott, a travel health specialist and medical director of Passport Health, Chicago says, “most Americans are vaccinated for diseases common to our country, but aren’t always protected when traveling abroad.” He advises that “those planning to travel internationally, especially for extended periods of time, visit a travel health practitioner to learn about preventative measures for travel-related diseases.”

In addition to personal protective measures such as insect repellant and protective bed netting, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that those who will spend 30 days or more in a JE-endemic region be vaccinated prior to arrival – which would include many business travelers on extended assignments.

Even if your team is traveling to Asia on a shorter assignment, they may want to consider vaccination if their work puts them at increased risk for a mosquito bite – for example, if they are visiting a factory in a rural area.

Promote good health with good planning

In addition to taking preventative measures, planning for the unexpected is key to successful travel – here are a few tips that may help set your employee up for good health while abroad:

  • Look into travel health insurance, either through your company plan or an extended policy.
  • Encourage your employee to research and join expat communities in the region where they will be staying – this will help with connectedness, adjusting to the new environment, and alleviating stress.
  • Promote mental and physical wellness through access to exercise – this could be a stationary exercise machine, gym membership, or bicycle – depending on security and the climate of the region.

If you are planning to send an employee on an international assignment, a travel health physician can set your valued team member up for a productive and healthful stay with a few precautionary measures before departure.

Find a travel health specialist near you by visiting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) website at wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/find-clinic. The CDC is also a good resource for travel information, advisories, and vaccination guidelines for your destination.

This article is sponsored by Valneva USA, Inc. To learn more about Japanese encephalitis and how to protect yourself, visit www.preventje.com.

Indication & Usage

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO,  including protamine sulfate a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

 

 

 

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