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INDICATION & USAGE

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO, including protamine sulfate a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

    

INDICATION & USAGE

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO, including protamine sulfate  a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals  is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

    

 

 

Know someone traveling abroad for school in the fall? Here are 4 things to help keep your student healthy

Jul 18, 2018 | Travel

Ready to send your college student packing? Traveling abroad is one of the most transformative opportunities you can give your soon-to-be college grad. Whether they’re seeking new life experiences and cultural immersion, looking to improve their language skills, or sprucing up their résumé, the memories they’ll gain through international study will last a lifetime.

And while you’re likely consumed with travel prep such as visa applications, rail passes, or finding that perfect backpack, it’s also a good time to take a few simple steps to help keep your student safe and healthy while away.

As enriching as overseas travel can be, it’s not completely without risk.

Here are four things to do before sending your college student tripping abroad:

Many students set sights on Western European countries for exchange programs, but with strong higher-education systems, rich cultural traditions, and stunning urban and rural landscapes, Asian countries have become a leading destination for international study. One disease to be aware of when visiting Asia is Japanese encephalitis (JE). JE is a rare but serious illness caused by a virus that is found across parts of Asia and transmitted through a mosquito bite. It is the leading cause of vaccine-preventable encephalitis in Asia. The best protection from JE is prevention – avoiding mosquito bites, and vaccinating before travel if your doctor suggests it.

  1. Check up. Make an appointment with a doctor or nurse specializing in travel health, who can advise if there are health risks where your student will be living or traveling, and what steps to take to guard against them. A travel health practitioner can also administer vaccines recommended for the region and time of year your child will be traveling. “Most individuals are vaccinated for the diseases endemic to their own countries,” says Dr. Scott Morcott, family practitioner and medical director of Passport Health, Chicago. “This doesn’t protect you from the pathogens that you may encounter in another country. Diseases such as Japanese encephalitis or Typhoid Fever do not typically pose a risk to Americans at home, and it might not occur to travelers to seek protection against these vaccine-preventable illnesses while traveling.”

    And be sure to send copies of any relevant health or vaccination records with your student!

 

  1. Bone up. Before he or she dives into the local delicacies, research the area where your student will be staying to be sure that the food and water are safe for visitors to consume. Generally speaking, it’s best to stick to bottled water when traveling. Dr. Morcott says, “be aware of local conditions and if there are travel health alerts in place for the region you’ll be visiting. Cholera, for example, is a bacterial infection most often encountered through contaminated food or drink, but it can be avoided with some simple precautionary measures.”

 

  1. Brush up. It’s a good idea to make an appointment to see your dentist before taking an extended international trip. This is especially true if you’re heading to remote or developing areas where access to good dental care might be difficult to come by. A regular cleaning and exam will help to head off any unexpected issues that could otherwise arise while far from home.

 

  1. Cover up. Consider investing in international health insurance coverage for the period of time your student will be traveling. This might be offered through your regular insurance provider, through your child’s university, or by private companies specializing in this type of coverage. At a minimum, you’ll want to consider coverage for emergency care should the need arise.

With a bit of research and preparation (and a visit to your qualified travel health professional), you can rest assured that your child is healthy and well while far from home.

Find a travel health specialist near you by visiting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) website. The CDC is also a good resource for travel information, advisories, and vaccination guidelines for your destination.

This article is sponsored by Valneva USA, Inc. To learn more about Japanese encephalitis and how to protect yourself, visit www.preventje.com.

Indication & Usage

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO,  including protamine sulfate a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

 

 

 

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