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INDICATION & USAGE

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO, including protamine sulfate a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

    

INDICATION & USAGE

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO, including protamine sulfate  a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals  is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

    

 

 

What is a travel health specialist and why should you care?

Jul 9, 2018 | Healthcare, Travel

You’ve noticed your eyeglasses aren’t as effective as they used to be and it’s time to update your prescription. So, naturally, you schedule an appointment with an optometrist. A routine dental cleaning calls for a visit to the dentist. Your 7-year-old has an ear infection, so you bring her to the pediatrician. It might seem obvious, but our reason for seeking care from a particular health professional is based on the match between our current needs and their specific area of expertise.

The same should apply when deciding between a visit to a travel health specialist and your regular family doctor when you’re planning international travel. Wondering what a travel health specialist actually does – and why and when you’d visit one? For routine health care, the expertise of your family doctor cannot be replaced. But if you’re heading overseas, a travel health specialist can provide specific, valuable recommendations and care to help keep you and your family healthy.

So – what’s so special about a travel health specialist?

Travel health specialists make health care recommendations based on the region, season, and other risk-factors related to where you are traveling.i They’re well-versed in the prevention of diseases common to specific parts of the world, such as typhoid, yellow fever, or Japanese encephalitis.

Travel health specialists can perform thorough examinations prior to travel, prescribe any necessary medications, and administer vaccines for diseases endemic to countries around the globe.i They can also advise you on how to avoid contaminated food and water and how best to protect yourself from illnesses transmitted by insects or parasites such as mosquitoes, ticks, or mites.

When should I see a travel health specialist?

Anyone who will be traveling abroad can benefit from a visit to a travel health specialist, especially those who will be overseas for an extended period of time, such as those studying abroad, on business trips or expat assignments, volunteering, or in the military.

Even for short trips abroad, your travel plans can play a part in your overall risk of contracting a disease.  In some parts of the world, outdoor activities can increase the risk of exposure to mosquito-borne and other diseases. If your itinerary includes activities like hiking, camping, fishing, or swimming – or time spent outside of major urban areas in places like beach resorts and national parks – it’s also important to consult a specialist well before take-off, as some vaccines should be administered at least thirty days before travel.i

Taking a trip to Asia? One disease to be aware of is Japanese encephalitis (JE) – a rare and potentially devastating mosquito-borne disease that can be prevented through vaccination and other personal protective measures, such as insect repellant and protective bed netting.ii A recent survey of 776 Americans traveling to Asia found that 85 percent were considered to be at an ‘increased-risk’ of exposure to Japanese encephalitis virus and should have been counseled about vaccination based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) guidelines. Yet, only 16 percent of individuals received a preventative vaccine.iii

A travel health specialist can provide information about what puts you at risk of contracting JE and other endemic diseases while traveling in Asia, and offer guidance on vaccination to keep you safe while traveling.iv

Find a travel health specialist near you by visiting CDC’s website at wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/find-clinic.

The CDC and vaccines.gov are also good resources for local travel information, advisories, and vaccination guidelines.

This article is sponsored by Valneva USA, Inc. To learn more about Japanese encephalitis and how to protect yourself, visit www.preventje.com.

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. See a Doctor Before You Travel. Updated December 22, 2008. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/see-doctor.   Accessed July 24, 2018.
  2. “Japanese Encephalitis.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 5 Aug. 2015, www.cdc.gov/japaneseencephalitis/qa/index.html.
  3. Data on file.
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. See a Doctor Before You Travel. Updated December 22, 2008. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/see-doctor.   Accessed July 24, 2018.

Indication & Usage

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO,  including protamine sulfate a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

 

 

 

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