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INDICATION & USAGE

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO, including protamine sulfate a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

    

INDICATION & USAGE

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO, including protamine sulfate  a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals  is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

    

 

 

You’ve heard of Zika and West Nile, but what is Japanese encephalitis and why should you care?

Jul 4, 2018 | Japanese encephalitis, Travel

Like Zika and West Nile, Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a potentially serious disease caused by a virus spread to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito.i Unlike Zika and West Nile, you’ve probably never heard of it.

What is JE?

As its name implies, JE is a form of encephalitis, or inflammation of the brain, caused by JE virus found across parts of Asia and the western Pacific.iMost people infected by JE virus suffer mild, flu-like symptoms or are asymptomatic; however, in some cases the infection results in JE and the outcome can be very serious.i

JE is rare, but for those who do contract the disease, the effects could be lifelong or even fatal. Up to 30 percent of people who develop JE do not survive, and of those who do, up to half suffer serious long-term complications, which can include neurological, cognitive, and psychiatric impairment.i,iii While there is no specific treatment, it can be prevented with personal protective measures to prevent mosquito bites and vaccination.ii

A recent survey of 776 U.S. adults who had traveled to Asia in the past 24 months found that about 50 percent of them were unaware that JE existed or of the possible consequences of contracting JE – even though the vast majority of those surveyed would be considered at increased-risk for exposure to JE virus based on their travel plans.iv

Who is at risk?

The risk of JE is low for travelers to Asia but can vary based on several factors, such as their activities, where they spend time (such as outside urban areas), and their duration of travel.v

Destination, Tokyo? You should still talk to a qualified travel health professional about your potential risk. The same survey of travelers to Asia found that 72 percent of respondents visited at least one area or participated in an activity that put them at increased risk for exposure to JE virus.iv Such activities included hiking/trekking, bicycling, camping, and visiting areas away from major cities such as rural areas, national parks, beach resorts or wilderness/jungle areas.v

How is it treated?

Prevention is key!

Japanese encephalitis has no specific treatment, and, once diagnosed, medical interventions are focused around easing symptoms and providing supportive care.i,ii Because of this, the best protection against JE is prevention – which can take the form of mosquito netting, long-sleeve shirts and pants, insect repellent (always choose an EPA-registered insect repellent), avoiding high-risk activities during transmission season such as fishing, boating, or hiking, and vaccination if your doctor suggests it.v

What can I do?

A visit to a travel health professional well in advance of your trip (at least 30 days) is a good idea to help understand your risk of exposure to JE and simple measures you can take to protect your health.vi Take simple steps to avoid mosquito bites and, depending on the time of year, length of stay, regions visited, and itinerary, vaccination might also be advised.v

As the saying goes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure – while rare, the effects of JE have the potential to be lifelong or even fatal. Protect yourself with a visit to a qualified travel health professional before your next trip!

Find a travel health specialist near you by visiting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) website at https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/find-clinic. The CDC is also a good resource for travel information, advisories, and vaccination guidelines for your destination.

This article is sponsored by Valneva USA, Inc. To learn more about Japanese encephalitis and how to protect yourself, visit www.preventje.com.

  1. World Health Organization. Fact sheets. Japanese encephalitis. Published December 2015. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs386/en. Accessed July 24, 2018.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Japanese encephalitis. Updated August 2015 https://www.cdc.gov/japaneseencephalitis/. Accessed July 24, 2018.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Yellow Book 2018, Chapter 3. Updated May 2017. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2018/infectious-diseases-related-to-travel/japanese-encephalitis. Accessed July 24, 2008.
  4. Data on file.
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Japanese encephalitis. Prevention. Updated August 2015 https://www.cdc.gov/japaneseencephalitis/prevention/. Accessed March 27, 2018.
  6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. See a Doctor Before You Travel. Updated December 22, 2008. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/see-doctor. Accessed July 24, 2018.

Indication & Usage

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO,  including protamine sulfate a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

 

 

 

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