INDICATION & USAGE

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO, including protamine sulfate a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

    

INDICATION & USAGE

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO, including protamine sulfate  a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals  is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

    

 

 

Make sure they’re protected
against Japanese encephalitis (JE).

Make sure they’re protected against Japanese encephalitis (JE).

How is JE treated?

There is no specific treatment for JE; prevention is the best protection.1,3,4

 The only available care for JE survivors is supportive, which can range from immediate life support measures, to long-term rehabilitation.1,3,4

JE virus is the most important cause of viral encephalitis in Asia.1

– World Health Organization (WHO)

There is no specific treatment for JE.3

– Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

How can you protect against JE?

If you’re traveling to Asia, it’s important to protect yourself from mosquitos that could carry the JE virus. Here are some protection strategies.8,9

Barrier protection

Use insect repellent on both skin and clothes, and wear clothes that cover exposed skin.8

Environmental protection

Stay in places with air-conditioned or screened rooms, or use bed nets and aerosol spray room insecticides.8

Reduced exposure

Keep your outdoor activities to a minimum, especially during peak biting hours, such as from dusk to dawn.8

Vaccination8,9:

Ask your healthcare professional about being vaccinated if you are:

  • Planning to spend 1 month or more in endemic areas during the JE virus transmission season, which may be year-round in some areas9
  • In a high-risk setting based on season, location, length of stay, and activities9
  • Not sure of all the places you’ll go, where you’ll be, or how long you’ll be staying9
  • Planning to be outdoors for an extended period of time, spend time in rural or agricultural areas, or traveling to an area with an ongoing JE outbreak9

Assess your need for JE vaccination.

How can you protect against JE?

If you’re traveling to Asia, it’s important to protect yourself from mosquitos that could carry the JE virus. Here are some protection strategies8,9

Barrier protection

Use insect repellent on both skin and clothes, and wear clothes that cover exposed skin.8

Environmental protection

Stay in places with air-conditioned or screened rooms, or use bed nets and aerosol spray room insecticides.8

Reduced exposure

Keep your outdoor activities to a minimum, especially during peak biting hours, such as from dusk to dawn.8

Vaccination8,9:

Ask your healthcare professional about being vaccinated if you are:

  • Planning to spend 1 month or more in endemic areas during the JE virus transmission season, which may be year-round in some areas9

  • In a high-risk setting based on season, location, length of stay, and activities9

  • Not sure of all the places you’ll go, where you’ll be, or how long you’ll be staying9

  • Planning to be outdoors for an extended period of time, spend time in rural or agricultural areas, or traveling to an area with an ongoing JE outbreak9

Assess your need for JE vaccination.

CDC Guidelines for Vaccination8,9

According to the CDC:

  • Travelers staying 1 month or longer in parts of Asia where the JE virus is found are recommended for vaccination

  • Even short-term travelers should consider vaccination if, among other things, their activities or location puts them at risk for a mosquito bite, or if their plans are uncertain

  • JE vaccine is not recommended for short-term travel restricted to urban areas or outside of the JE virus transmission season

If you are traveling to Asia, you should be assessed for your risk of exposure and educated about how you can protect yourself from JE.

Talk to your healthcare provider
about whether vaccination with
IXIARO® is right for you.

What’s Your JE-IQ?

Myths and Facts
about JE

MYTH

JE only occurs in Japan.

FACT

False. JE is found in 24 different countries across Asia.1

MYTH

JE is nothing to worry about.

FACT

False. The number of reported JE cases in US travelers is few, but JE does occur and in rare cases, its consequences can be devastating.1,3,4

 

MYTH

As long as I stay in the cities, I’m not at risk for JE.

FACT

False. Although the risk of infection with JE virus may be lower in cities, the most recent cases of JE in US travelers to Asia were in urban and 
peri-urban regions.10

MYTH

I’m not staying in Asia for a long time, so I don’t need to worry about JE.

FACT

False. Data show that more than one-third of travelers who developed JE were short-term travelers to Asia.6

MYTH

People only get bitten by infected mosquitos during rainy season.

FACT

False. Depending on the country, some travelers to Asia may be bitten any time and transmission of the JE virus can occur year-round.11

What’s Your JE-IQ?

Myths and Facts
about JE

MYTH

JE only occurs in Japan.

FACT

False. JE is found in 24 different countries across Asia.1

MYTH

JE is nothing to worry about.

FACT

False. The number of reported JE cases in US travelers is few, but JE does occur and in rare cases, its consequences can be devastating.1,3,4

 

MYTH

As long as I stay in the cities, I’m not at risk for JE.

FACT

False. Although the risk of infection with JE virus may be lower in cities, the most recent cases of JE in US travelers to Asia were in urban and 
peri-urban regions.10

MYTH

I’m not staying in Asia for a long time, so I don’t need to worry about JE.

FACT

False. Data show that more than one-third of travelers who developed JE were short-term travelers to Asia.6

 

MYTH

People only get bitten by infected mosquitos during rainy season.

FACT

False. Depending on the country, some travelers to Asia may be bitten any time and transmission of the JE virus can occur year-round.11

Indication & Usage

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO,  including protamine sulfate a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

 

 

 

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