Protect your family
while you protect your country

Keep your loved ones safe from Japanese encephalitis (JE) during deployment in Asia by scheduling IXIARO vaccinations.

Protect your family
while you protect your country

Keep your loved ones safe from Japanese encephalitis (JE) during deployment in Asia by scheduling IXIARO vaccinations.

Mosquito

Japanese
Encephalitis

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Though rare for travelers, JE is a public health problem in most of Asia.1 Vaccination against this potentially deadly disease is required for service people and encouraged for families living in Japan and Korea.2

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Contact your physician or healthcare provider for more information on
IXIARO—

and make sure your family is protected.

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Japanese Encephalitis

99

countries affected in Asia, Southeast Asia, and parts of the western Pacific3,4

99,999

cases are estimated to occur each year in asia3,4



up to

99%

of JE cases prove to be fatal3



Of those who survive, up to

99%

have long-term consequences3

Geographic Distribution of Japanese Encephalitis

Detailed Japanese Encephalitis Map

What
is Japanese Encephalitis?

JE is a form of encephalitis, or inflammation of the brain, caused by JE virus.3 While most cases are asymptomatic, infection with JE virus can develop into JE.3 It is the most common vaccine-preventable cause of encephalitis in Asia.3 JE is endemic in 24 countries in Asia, Southeast Asia, and parts of the western Pacific.4

What
are the consequences of Japanese Encephalitis?

JE can result in life-threatening or life-altering consequences. Approximately 68,000 cases of JE are estimated to occur each year in Asia.3,4 Up to 30% of these cases will be fatal—and of those who survive, up to 50% will suffer from neurologic or psychiatric complications.3

Who
can be affected?

Anyone traveling to Asia where the JE virus exists can be affected by JE. Military personnel and their families stationed, or expatriates living, in endemic areas are at risk.3 People traveling to endemic areas for 1 month or more during the JE virus transmission season, which may be year round, are also at risk. This includes long-term travelers or recurrent travelers (multiple trips with combined duration of one month or longer), anyone traveling to an area with an ongoing JE outbreak, and travelers to endemic areas who are uncertain of their activities, travel plans, or duration of travel.5

Who
should get the vaccine?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends JE vaccination for anyone—including military personnel and their families—spending 1 month or longer in endemic areas during the JE virus transmission season, which may be year round in some locations.5

Military personnel deployed to endemic areas are vaccinated, and all Command-sponsored dependents spending 30 or more consecutive days in endemic areas are encouraged to receive vaccination before departure to ensure greatest protection.5

People who live in these countries are routinely vaccinated against JE, and you and your family should be as well.

Even some short-term travelers should consider vaccination if they are spending time outside of urban areas during JE virus transmission season, travel during an outbreak, have an uncertain itinerary, or are engaged in activities that expose them to mosquitos. This includes5:

  • Spending substantial time outdoors in rural or agricultural areas, especially during the evening or night
  • Extensive outdoor activities (e.g., camping, hiking, biking, fishing, hunting, or farming)
  • Staying in accommodations without air conditioning, screens, or bed nets

Vaccination is not recommended for short-term travelers whose visits will be restricted to urban areas or to times outside a well-defined JE virus transmission season.

Who
should get the vaccine?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends JE vaccination for anyone—including military personnel and their families—spending 1 month or longer in endemic areas during the JE virus transmission season, which may be year round in some locations.5

Military personnel deployed to endemic areas are vaccinated, and all Command-sponsored dependents spending 30 or more consecutive days in endemic areas are encouraged to receive vaccination before departure to ensure greatest protection.5

People who live in these countries are routinely vaccinated against JE, and you and your family should be as well.

Even some short-term travelers should consider vaccination if they are spending time outside of urban areas during JE virus transmission season, travel during an outbreak, have an uncertain itinerary, or are engaged in activities that expose them to mosquitos. This includes5:

  • Spending substantial time outdoors in rural or agricultural areas, especially during the evening or night
  • Extensive outdoor activities (e.g., camping, hiking, biking, fishing, hunting, or farming)
  • Staying in accommodations without air conditioning, screens, or bed nets

Vaccination is not recommended for short-term travelers whose visits will be restricted to urban areas or to times outside a well-defined JE virus transmission season.

What is
IXIARO?

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by JE virus, approved for use in individuals two months of age and older.

For adults aged 18 – 65 years, the vaccine is given in 2 doses, 7 days apart (accelerated schedule) or 28 days apart (standard schedule), and vaccination should be completed 7 days before departure.6

For pediatric (2 months to <18 years) and older adult (66+ years) travelers, the vaccine is given in 2 doses, 28 days apart (standard schedule), and vaccination should be completed 7 days before departure.6

If you were vaccinated at least 11 months previously, a booster dose* may be given if you expect ongoing exposure or re-exposure to JE virus.6

IXIARO has a well-established safety profile and protective immune response.6 The most common side effects are headache and myalgia, and the most common injection-site reactions are pain and tenderness.6

To learn more about receiving the vaccination for you and your family, contact your healthcare provider today.

*Children from 14 months to <3 years of age should receive a single 0.25 mL booster does. Individuals 3 years of age and older should receive a single 0.5 mL booster dose.6


If you don’t have time to get both shots before your departure, you can do the first shot in the United States and get the second from your base medical facility in country.

If you are already deployed, ask your base medical facility about protecting you and your family.

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Indications and Usage

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine, or any component of IXIARO, including protamine sulfate ─ a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals ─ is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO. Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals. Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO. Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO. Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to < 1 year of age; fever in children 1 to < 12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to < 18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967. You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

Indications and Usage

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus. IXIARO is approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine, or any component of IXIARO, including protamine sulfate ─ a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals ─ is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO. Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals. Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO. Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO. Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to < 1 year of age; fever in children 1 to < 12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to < 18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967. You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.



References: 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Japanese encephalitis vaccine. https://www.cdc.gov/japaneseencephalitis/vaccine/index.html Accessed March 5, 2018. 2. Health.mil. Vaccine recommendations by AOR. https://health.mil/Military-Health-Topics/Health-Readiness/Immunization-Healthcare/Vaccine-Recommendations/Vaccine-Recommendations-by-AOR. Accessed March 5, 2018. 3. Fischer M, Lindsey N, Staples JE, Hills S; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Japanese encephalitis vaccines: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). MMWR Recomm Rep. 2010;59(RR-1):1-27. 4. Campbell GL, Hills SL, Fischer M, et al. Estimated global incidence of Japanese encephalitis: a systematic review. Bull World Health Organ. 2011;89(10):766-774E. 5. IXIARO [prescribing information]. Vienna, Austria; Valneva Austria GmbH; 2018. 6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Yellow Book 2018, Chapter 3. http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2014/chapter-3-infectious-diseases-related-to-travel/japanese-encephalitis. Accessed November 8, 2017.