Site provided by Valneva USA, Inc.

INDICATION & USAGE

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO, including protamine sulfate a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

    

INDICATION & USAGE

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, any other Japanese encephalitis vaccine,  or any component of IXIARO, including protamine sulfate  a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals  is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO.  Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals.  Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO.  Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO.  Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.  You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

    

 

 

 

A different type of mosquito

Sep 10, 2019 | Travel

Planning a trip to Asia? You are no doubt already dreaming of scenic landscapes, rich cultural experiences and exotic foods.

Many Asian countries boast warm, balmy climates and high levels of rainfall. There’s often no cold season to speak of, allowing for year-round breeding for pests of the buzzing variety—like mosquitos. And these pests may carry viruses that are transmittable to humans, including Japanese encephalitis.

Mosquitos and humans have a long and sordid past.

They’ve been human-kind’s constant companion since the beginning of time. In the U.S., most of us just put out citronella candles and accept them as a nuisance.

But in many regions of the world, including Asia, changes in climate conditions, population growth and urban sprawl have led to increases in mosquito breeding grounds, especially in urban and semi-urban areas. And if you’re visiting one of these idyllic locations, you should know that the mosquito you’ll encounter is not your backyard variety.

More than just a bug bite

Like Zika and West Nile viruses, the Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus is spread to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito, and the infection can have devastating consequences. Unlike Zika and West Nile, you’ve probably never heard of it.

One reason is this: in many Asian countries, JE vaccination is routine. Just like people in the United States receive the measles, mumps and rubella protection as children, most people in JE-risk regions are often protected with a vaccine.

And don’t let the name fool you—Japanese encephalitis isn’t only found in Japan. Cases have been reported in more than 20 countries in Asia and parts of the western Pacific. In fact, despite those local vaccine programs, there are approximately 68,000 cases of JE every year (and that’s just what’s reported). But most visitors to these regions haven’t been told about JE and aren’t protected.

Suffering the most serious consequences of the JE virus is rare: many may only experience mild flu-like symptoms and might not even realize that it’s due to the virus. Some, however, will suffer more serious – even fatal – consequences, including brain swelling or stroke-like symptoms that can result in permanent neurological damage.

Plan for good health

Whether you’re the type of traveler who plans your itinerary to the letter, or one who likes to let spontaneity be your guide, it’s important to plan for a healthy visit by brushing up on some basic steps to avoid exposure to local mosquitos.

While there is no cure for JE, it can be prevented by taking steps to avoid mosquito bites, and with vaccination.

Prevention strategies you should consider

Try to avoid mosquitoes!
Mosquitoes are most active during the cooler hours from dusk to dawn. Limit the amount of time spent outsides or with exposed skin during these hours.

  • Use EPA-registered insect repellent, such as those containing DEET, IR3535, picaridin or oil of lemon eucalyptus.
  • Wear protective clothing that covers as much of your skin as possible, such as long sleeves, pants and high socks when outdoors.
  • Carry a mosquito net. Not every hotel off the beaten path (or on!) will supply bed and window netting. Plan ahead and pack your own bed net to avoid surprises.

Vaccinate if you are at risk

  • Do you travel frequently to Asia, are planning a long trip (e.g., a month), or will you be taking up residence?
  • Is it possible you might participate in unplanned excursions and/or activities (i.e., something you would learn about once you’re there)?
  • Will you be spending time outdoors (day or night) exploring, hiking, fishing, biking, camping, etc.?
  • Is there a chance you’ll be staying in accommodations without air conditioning, screens or bed nets?

If you answered yes to any of the above, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention vaccination might be right for you. See a travel health provider to find out for sure.

Taking a few extra steps to stay healthy, along with a visit to a travel health provider, will leave you resting easy on the adventure of a lifetime.

To find a travel health provider near you click here.

This article is sponsored by Valneva USA, Inc. To learn more about Japanese encephalitis and how to protect yourself, visit www.preventje.com.

SOURCES

Balogun, Emmanuel O, et al. “Global Warming and the Possible Globalization of Vector-Borne Diseases: a Call for Increased Awareness and Action.” Tropical Medicine and Health, BioMed Central, 24 Nov. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5121979/

Heffelfinger JD, Li X, Batmunkh N. et al. Japanese encephalitis surveillance and immunization – Asia and Western Pacific regions, 2016. Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017;66(22):579-583.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Yellow Book 2020, Chapter 3. Updated July 2, 2019. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2020/noninfectious-health-risks/mosquitoes-ticks-and-other-arthropods. Accessed September 2019.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Japanese encephalitis. Vaccine. https://www.cdc.gov/japaneseencephalitis/vaccine/index.html. Reviewed July 25, 2019. Accessed September 2019.

Indication & Usage

IXIARO is a vaccine indicated for the prevention of disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus, approved for use in individuals 2 months of age and older.

Important Safety Information

Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of IXIARO, other Japanese encephalitis vaccine, any or any component of IXIARO, including protamine sulfate ─ a compound known to cause hypersensitivity reactions in some individuals ─ is a contraindication to administration of IXIARO. Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to another Japanese Encephalitis vaccine may be referred to an allergist for evaluation if immunization with IXIARO is considered.

Vaccination with IXIARO may not protect all individuals. Individuals with a weakened immune system may have a diminished immune response to IXIARO. Fainting may occur when receiving any injection, including IXIARO. Tell your healthcare practitioner if you have a history of fainting from injections.

The most common (>10%) adverse reactions were: fever, irritability, diarrhea, and injection site redness in infants 2 months to <1 year of age; fever in children 1 to <12 years of age; pain and tenderness in adolescents 12 to <18 years of age; and, headache, muscle pain, and injection site pain and tenderness in adults.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967. You should ask your healthcare practitioner for medical advice about adverse events.

For more information, please see the physician’s Prescribing Information and ask your healthcare practitioner about the risk and benefits of IXIARO.

 

 

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